Jasady: Translating from Arabic, it means "my body"
  • Because the value of diagnostics and taking care of health shouldn’t just be during pandemics.

  • Because we know women are always taking care of someone other than themselves

  • Because it’s OK if you put yourself first

  • It’s time we lean into biological differences to better understand women’s health and account for women’s clinical characteristics and personal needs.

  • It’s time for women to take charge of their health.

  • As a world leader in diagnostics and healthcare, we have a responsibility to act, and to help put the healthcare needs of women firmly in the spotlight.

Whether it’s your first time ever to a doctor's office. or the first time in a while, we understand it can be daunting. In the guides below, we offer you some ideas to make it easier and more comfortable for you.

Consider bringing a friend or family member for the visit if you are not sure how to explain your physical problem correctly, if you are forgetful or fluster easily it’s important to take an active role when talking with your physician.

Write down a list of questions related to your most pressing concerns about your symptoms or condition before you visit your doctor. This can also help maximize your visit and the time used describing your symptoms.

Take some time to read about the physicians you’re interested in. If you don’t feel comfortable, you can always consider another one.

Tell your doctor how your symptoms feel. For example, if you’re experiencing headaches, use descriptive words like sharp, dull, stabbing, or throbbing. You can use these kinds of terms to describe many physical symptoms.

Explain to or show your doctor the exact location where which you’re experiencing your symptoms. You want to be as specific as possible so say "the front of my kneecap is swollen and has throbbing pain" instead of something general like "I have pain in my leg." You should also note if the symptoms extend to another location.

Mention how long you’ve had your symptoms. The more specific date you can pinpoint, the easier it may be for your doctor to figure out what is causing your symptoms.

Note how frequently you have or notice symptoms. This information can also help your doctor figure out what’s causing your symptoms.

Be honest about your symptoms. There is nothing you should ever feel embarrassed about with a doctor.

  • What are the different treatment options?

  • How will I hear about my test results?

  • What are the next steps?

  • Is there anything I should do/change while I’m waiting for results?

Tell your doctor how your symptoms feel. For example, if you’re experiencing headaches, use descriptive words like sharp, dull, stabbing, or throbbing. You can use these kinds of terms to describe many physical symptoms.

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